Images from the Library

From O. Phelps Brown’s The complete herbalist: or, the people their own physicians by the use of nature’s remedies showing the great curative properties of all herbs, gums, balsams, barks, flowers and roots ; how they should be prepared, when and under what influences selected, at what times gathered, and for what diseases administered. Also, separate treatises on fod and drinks ; clothing ; exercise ; the regulation of the passions, life, health, and disease; longevity; medication; air and sunshine ; bathing ; sleep, etc. Also, symptoms of prevalent diseases ; special treatment in special cases; and a new and plain system of hygienic principles (1871).

While We Were Out…

…new items were being added to our collection steadily! Here are a few:

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

Digital Highlights: Bell’s Art

Sir Charles Bell (1774-1842) is probably best known for his work in the human nervous system. He was one of the first to work out the detailed ramifications of human nerves and their myriad connections and interconnections. His work proved to be foundational in the field of neuroscience and resulted in the naming of at least one condition after him, Bell’s Palsy, a form of temporary facial paralysis.

Bell also had interest in the arts and some practical experience as an artist. This gave him some advantage in terms of describing his anatomical dissections and presenting them both to other medical professionals and the public. He also wrote an early book on the application of knowledge learned from medical dissection to art: The anatomy and philosophy of expression as connected with the fine arts. This was first published in 1806 but republished at least once later in the century after Bell had achieved a position of prominence in Victorian London.

Flip through the pages of Bell’s work below or follow this link to read The anatomy and philosophy of expression as connected with the fine arts.

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

New to the MHL!

Last week we announced the official opening of over 3,000 digitized volumes of historical medical journals.

Here are some highlights of what else is new in our collection:

And as always for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!