Digital Highlights: “The Magic Monitor”

This is a small book; but it contains as much reading as a large and heavy volume of five hundred pages, printed in large type. I mention this fact so that you will not mis-estimate the amount of labor I have performed to get it up. No one but myself can ever understand, or form a correct idea of, the research, study, experiment and experience that have been expended on these pages.

Most authors probably feel this way about their published works, but H. Monnett wanted to be sure there was no possibility for confusion when it came to his The magic monitor and medical intelligencer : containing wonderful and elaborate revelations concerning the following subjects–love, courtship & marriage, how to prevent an increase of family, how to cure self-abuse and its results, the detection, prevention & cure of all private diseases, etc.

The heading for his first chapter is almost equally eyecatching, in part declaring MERCURY! Beware of it. Monnett himself espouses a herbal system. He goes on to make brief mention of a number of Desultory Items, including that the healthiest children are born in the spring (February through May), that marriage blunts the imagination, and that “consumption” (presumably tubercular infection) has been corrected in both men and women through marriage.

Given that The magic monitor was published in 1857 it is, perhaps, depressing in its familiarity for the modern reader to find Monnett enthusiastically promoting the doctrine that a woman cannot become pregnant from a rape. Certainly the idea is nothing new.

Flip through the pages below or follow this link to read The magic monitor.

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

A/V from the Library

Click “play” above or follow this link to watch The Both mechanical respirator (195?).

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

Images from the Library

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From Lever Brothers’ The “Sunlight” Year Book for 1898. A Treasury of Useful Information of Value to All Members of the Household. Including The Calendar and Kindred Matter, Universal History, Geography, Army and Navy, Science, Literature, Fine Arts, Architecture, Commerce, Agriculture, Medical, Sports and Pastimes, The Household, Port Sunlight, etc. Also Story by Conan Doyle. With Portraits and Numerous Illustrations. (1898).

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

Digital Highlights: Who Wants to be a Mesmerist?

Who doesn’t want to finish up the summer with a new skill? Why not try mesmerism! Thomas Welton is here to help with his 1884 Mental Magic: “The public again, after a lapse of 20 years, being much interested in the above subject, and having no clear explanation given to them on it or how to produce for themselves far higher Phenomena of the same class, I venture to hope that this work will not be unwelcome…”

Welton not only offers step-by-step instructions on how to mesmerise, but also instructions on using the planchette, a divination tool popular among spiritualists. The planchette was something like a wheeled Ouija board, the idea being that the spiritual power would transfer through the medium and into the board through touch and then make itself known by writing on a sheet of paper laid below.

Flip through the pages below or follow this link to read Mental magic: a rationale of thought reading, and its attendant phenomena and their application to the discovery of new medicines, obscure diseases, correct delineations of character, lost persons and property, mines and prings of water, and all hidden and secret things.

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

A/V from the Library

Click “play” below or follow this link to listen to Greensboro Plant Opening (1973).

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

Images from the Library

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From Karl Heinrich von Bardeleben’s Handbuch der Anatomie des Menschen (1896).

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

Digital Highlights: Overworking Your Brain

“Brain-work” may not be something we’re thinking about in the middle of the summer but the dangers of overwork are always with us — at least, so thinks Horatio C. Wood. In 1880, he published Brain-work and overwork to publicize his view of the causes and cures of mental over-exertion which include gluttony and artificial stimulants — it seems unlikely that his arguments against coffee and tea made many converts. Still less attractive to the modern readers are his criticisms of the modern working woman: “Among the saddest wrecks of our modern civilization are the faded, heartless, helpless, and hopeless women…” (73)

Flip through the pages below or click this link to read Brain-work and overwork.

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

Our Reading List (#6)

Here are a few things that have gotten our reading attention this week:

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

Images from the Library

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From John Gordon’s Engravings of the skeleton of the human body (1818).

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

Digital Highlights: “Every Man Can Be His Own Doctor”

Who doesn’t enjoy a good self-help read from time to time? This one comes stocked with suggestions for home medical treatment, rules for healthy living, and suggestions on how to take out stains (among other recipes)!

Flip through the pages below or follow this link to read The American household adviser : an ever ready guide for the wants of the family (1875).

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

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