Images from the Library

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From Henry Heather Bigg’s On artificial limbs : their construction and application (1855).

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

MHL Partners Talk Publishing Innovation

The Wellcome Trust and The New York Academy of Medicine co-sponsored a panel at the recent American Historical Association meeting in New York City. The panel discussion aimed to explore (broadly!) the possibilities and challenges of the creation and publishing of research in an digital environment.

The panel was chaired by Stephen Robertson of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media; as one might imagine, it was enthusiastically Tweeted by those present. In case you happened to miss it (like me!), here’s the Storified version, courtesy of NYAM.

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

Research travel grant for Yale’s Cushing/Whitney Medical Historical Library

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Ferenc Gyorgyey, 1979, courtesy of Yale Medicine.

The Historical Library of the Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library at Yale University is pleased to announce its eighth annual Ferenc Gyorgyey Research Travel Award for use of the Historical Library.

The Medical Historical Library, located in New Haven, Connecticut, holds one of the country’s largest collections of rare medical books, journals, prints, photographs, and pamphlets. Special strengths are the works of Hippocrates, Galen, Vesalius, Boyle, Harvey, Culpeper, Priestley, and S. Weir Mitchell, and works on anesthesia, and smallpox inoculation and vaccination. The Library owns over fifty medieval and renaissance manuscripts, Arabic and Persian manuscripts, and over 300 medical incunabula.  The notable Clements C. Fry Collection of Prints and Drawings has over 2,500 fine prints, drawings, and posters from the 15th century to the present on medical subjects.  The library also holds a great collection of tobacco advertisements, patent medicine ephemera, and a large group of materials from Harvey Cushing, one of the founding fathers of neurosurgery.

The 2015-2016 travel grant is available to historians, medical practitioners, and other researchers who wish to use the collections of the Medical Historical Library:  http://historical.medicine.yale.edu/.  There is a single award of up to $1,500 for one week of research during the academic fiscal year July 1, 2015 – June 30, 2016.  Funds may be used for transportation, housing, food, and photographic reproductions. The award is limited to residents of the United States and Canada. Applicants should send a completed application form, curriculum vitae and a description of the project including the relevance of the collections of the Historical Library to the project, and two references attesting to the particular project. Preference will be given to applicants beyond commuting distance to the Historical Library.  This award is for use of Medical Historical special collections and is not intended for primary use of special collections in other libraries at Yale.  Applications are due by Monday, MAY 4th, 2015.  They will be considered by a committee and the candidates will be informed by JUNE 8th, 2015. An application form can be found on our websitehttp://historical.medicine.yale.edu/us/grant

Applications and requests for further information should be sent to:

Melissa Grafe, Ph.D
John R. Bumstead Librarian for Medical History
Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library
Yale University
P.O. Box 208014
New Haven, CT 06520-8014
Telephone: 203- 785-4354
Fax: 203-785-5636
E-mail: melissa.grafe@yale.edu

Additional information about the Library and its collections may be found at: http://historical.medicine.yale.edu/

Images from the Library

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From Christopher Heath’s A manual of minor surgery and bandaging: for the use of house-surgeons, dressers and junior practitioners (1897).

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

Digital Highlights: Hygiene and Home Nursing

It is interesting to note that Louisa C. Lippitt’s 1919 Personal hygiene and home nursing is specifically directed in the subtitle to girls and women. In modern parlance this would be described as a ‘gendered’ assumption: why would a man not find it useful to know how to give a bedbound invalid a sponge bath? why should women be the only ones to know about tuberculosis, chicken pox, or even constipation? Lippitt herself was a nursing instructor and a “head reconstruction aide” in the Medical Department of the United States Army and she acknowledges and dedicates her book to both her parents.

Lippitt’s text is mostly generalist in tone, giving information and directions that would be useful to anyone caring for the sick or  interested in the health aspects of running an up-to-date 1920s home. She starts from the basics — even including visual instructions on how to shake down a thermometer!

Flip through the pages below or follow this link to read Louisa Lippitt’s Personal hygiene and home nursing: a practical text for girls and women for home and school use.

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

The UK MHL Is On Its Way!

At the end of last July, the Wellcome Library, a MHL partner, announced the creation of the UK MHL project. The project plans to digitize about 15 million pages worth of content from ten partners, including UCL (University College London), the University of Leeds, the University of Glasgow, the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, King’s College London and the University of Bristol and the libraries of the Royal College of Physicians of London, the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Royal College of Surgeons of England.

Over the summer, the Wellcome worked with the Internet Archive to create a large scanning center on Euston Road, capable of housing over a dozen scanning units and thousands of books in process. Fourteen staffers work at the Euston center and they’re currently working through materials from University College London, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Glasgow University Library, and the Wellcome.

Christy Henshaw, Digitization Programme Manager at the Wellcome, has written a great blog post walking us through the process of selection and digitization:

The work begins with the hard copy books in their home libraries. Partner libraries select the books and check condition, size, and suitability for digitisation. They provide accurate inventories, information on special handling requirements where necessary, and carry out any necessary repairs or preparations such as splitting any pesky uncut pages and marking the start and end of books or pamphlets that are bound together. They carefully pack the books into large crates for shipment – and may prepare anything from 4 – 15 crates in a single shipment.

Read the rest of her post here!

Packing books at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh to send to the Euston Scan Centre. Image credit: Iain Milne.

Packing books at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh to send to the Euston Scan Centre. Image credit: Iain Milne.

Images from the Library

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From the Annual Report of New York Hospital Department of Psychiatry-Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic (1937).

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

Digital Highlights: A Clinic Reports

After Lisa Mix’s post on hospital reports, the series of annual reports from the Payne-Whitney psychiatric clinic caught my eye this week.

The report for 1935 is the third annual for the department and is a detailed write-up of clinic activities. As of the end of December 1935, for example, they had 70 in-patients, male and female. The statistics for the year described discharged patients as ‘Recovered,’ ‘Much Improved,’ ‘Improved,’ and ‘Unimproved’ — most patients fell into the latter two categories. In terms of patients admitted, the table of diagnoses shows the largest number of cases (53) under ‘schizophrenia.’ Not all patients were either admitted to the clinic for long-term stays or even accepted by the clinic for treatment; the out-patient department statistics show 49 cases rejected.

The report goes on to detail the kind and number of treatments given to patients, the staff training offered at the clinic, and a brief financial health report.

Flip through the pages of the report below or follow this link to read Annual Report of New York Hospital Department of Psychiatry-Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic for 1935.

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

New to the MHL!

Here in the US, we’ve just come back from two weeks of much-needed and refreshing vacation — but that doesn’t mean we don’t have new titles for you!

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

Images from the Library

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From A.W. Chase’s Dr. Chase’s third, last and complete receipt book and household physician, or, Practical knowledge for the people, from the life-long observations of the author : embracing the choicest, most valuable and entirely new receipts in every department of medicine, mechanics, and househould economy : including a treatise on the diseases of women and children, in fact, the book for the million, with remarks and explanations which adapt it to the every-day wants of the people arranged in departments and most copiously indexed (1890).

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

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