Images from the Library

americanmedicalb13bige_0342

From Jacob Bigelow’s American medical botany, being a collection of the native medicinal plants of the United States, containing their botanical history and chemical analysis, and properties and uses in medicine, diet and the arts, with coloured engravings .. (1817)

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

A/V from the Library

Click “play” above or follow this link to watch Jamestown Anniversary ’62 (1961).

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

Browse over 3,000 digitized volumes of historical medical journals!

Over the past two years, we have posted a few updates on the MHL’s collaborative project to digitize significant American medical journals, primarily dating from 1797 to 1923. This project, “Expanding the Medical Heritage Library”, was generously funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (grant # PW‐51014‐12) and included MHL partners The College of Physicians of Philadelphia, Columbia University Libraries, Harvard’s Countway Library, and Yale’s Cushing/Whitney Library.

We’re proud to say that the project has not only been completed, but that we’ve exceeded our goal of digitizing 1.7 million pages! While we encourage you to explore the full-text search tool available on our website, you can now also browse over 3,000 volumes that comprise our 336 journal titles. If you’d rather browse by date or search all fields, we encourage you to download the CSV file, also available on the journals browse page.

This browse function is a true product of MHL collaboration. Partners worked together to fill-in gaps in each others’ journal runs and to standardize our metadata so that the user could browse a full title run of a digitized journal without needing to worry about where the physical item was located.

Many of the journals selected reflect emerging specialties in the nineteenth century, such as dermatology and pediatrics, and many complete (or nearly complete) runs of significant local and state journals are now freely available for browsing, including the New York Medical Journal and the Maryland Medical Journal.

Stay tuned for more updates, including information about an improved full-text search tool that will allow users to extract even more from our digitized journals!

Images from the Library

americanmedicalb13bige_0185

From Jacob Bigelow’s American medical botany, being a collection of the native medicinal plants of the United States, containing their botanical history and chemical analysis, and properties and uses in medicine, diet and the arts, with coloured engravings .. (1817)

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

Digital Highlight: Medical Education for Women

This seemed like an appropriate highlight for a Friday in Women’s History MonthAn appeal on behalf of the medical education of women from 1856.

The pamphlet — under 20 pages long — is a succinct summing up of the history of women as medical professionals. It only takes a few pages to do this because Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman admitted to a medical college in the United States, had received her degree less than a decade before this publication. The pamphlet appeals not only for a wider admittance of women to medical schools, but for the establishment of a hospital for women within New York City.

The proposed hospital — based on the New York Infirmary and Dispensary for women and children which had been opened in 1854 — was to be a teaching hospital as well as a straightforward place of treatment.

Flip through the pages below or follow this link to read An appeal.

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

New to the MHL: Hiram Corson Diaries

Dr. Hiram Corson, an 1828 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, made his first diary entry March 31, 1827, while he was still a medical student.  His last entry was dated January 31, 1896.  He died March 4, 1896.  He was well-known nationally and was highly respected by such illuminati as Sir William Osler.

The diaries of Dr. Hiram Corson give many insights into the man, the society and times in which he lived, the Civil War, and most especially into medical education and the medical profession of the nineteenth century.  More than any other man in America, Hiram Corson was responsible for women physicians gaining recognition and being accepted into the medical profession.

Undaunted by reprisals or scorn, Hiram Corson was an outspoken abolitionist.  His sense of justice caused him to respond to many issues.  His public awareness throughout his long life is reflected in his diaries, which contain a treasure of information.

For more than thirty years he worked for the better care for the mentally ill.  In 1877 Pennsylvania Governor John F. Hartranft appointed Dr. Hiram Corson to the Board of Trustees of the State Lunatic Asylum at Harrisburg “in recognition of his life-long interest and zealous efforts in behalf of the insane.”

Flip through the pages below or follow this link to read any one of the three volumes of Hiram Corson’s diaries.

Images from the Library

americanmedicalb13bige_0170

From Jacob Bigelow’s American medical botany, being a collection of the native medicinal plants of the United States, containing their botanical history and chemical analysis, and properties and uses in medicine, diet and the arts, with coloured engravings .. (1817)

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

A/V from the Library

Click “play” above or follow this link to watch An appeal! from Bolton Infirmary (1929).

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

The Sawin Library Joins the MHL

Doctor Robert Blizzard with an unidentified child patient.

Doctor Robert Blizzard with an unidentified child patient.

We are happy to announce free access to the complete run of the journal, Growth, Genetics, and Hormones, 1985-2010. The digitization of Growth, Genetics, and Hormones was a joint venture between the Pediatric Endocrine Society and the Endocrine Society.

 Growth, Genetics, and Hormones was first published in 1985.  The quarterly publication was developed, primarily, to provide a close look at current – and often controversial – topics in endocrinology, genetics, and metabolism and their potential clinical applications. To ensure that this goal was met several nationally and internationally respected authorities in genetics, endocrinology, anthropometrics, pediatrics, pharmacology, and metabolism served on the Editorial Board.  For the inaugural issue, the eminent investigators who served on the editorial board included – Dr. Robert M. Blizzard of the University of Virginia School of Medicine;  Dr. Jorgen Bierich of the University of Tobingen, West Germany; Dr. Judith Hall of the University of British Columbia Medical School; Dr. Fima Lifshitz of Cornell University School of Medicine; Dr. David Rimoin of the University of California at Los Angeles; and Dr. Alan Rogol of the University of Virginia School of Medicine.  Dr. Robert M. Blizzard served as editor-in-chief until his retirement in 2004, at which time Dr. Fima Lifshitz became editor-in-chief.  Dr. Lifshitz held this position until the final issue of Growth, Genetics, and Hormones was published in 2010.  This journal provides a picture of the most important developments in the study of growth, genetics, and hormones over a twenty-five year period.

Images from the Library

americanmedicalb13bige_0012

From Jacob Bigelow’s American medical botany, being a collection of the native medicinal plants of the United States, containing their botanical history and chemical analysis, and properties and uses in medicine, diet and the arts, with coloured engravings .. (1817)

As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

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